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Phone: 780-438-2472

Open: Mon – Fri: 9:00 – 5:30

Daylight Saving – Spring Ahead

Written by downtown on . Posted in Fresh Copy Newsletter

This weekend Albertans (and our clocks) took a leap towards spring with Daylight Saving time. This allows us to enjoy sunlight longer into the evenings. With spring just around the corner and the days gradually getting longer, this time change is a harbinger of the season of growth and regeneration.

The conecpt of daylight savings dates back as far as 1895 in New Zealand, however the first country to implement this practice was the German Empire in 1916, as a way to conserve coal during wartime (it was known as Sommerzeit). Within the next two years, many countries worldwide, including Britain, Canada and the USA, followed suit. Daylight saving time is not generally observed in countries near the equator, as the variation in sunrise is not significant enough to warrant the change.

Here are some fun facts we have compiled about daylight saving time from around the globe:

  • Egypt had four daylight saving time changes in 2010. It was
    meant to make the month of Ramadan (which fell during a
    hot summer that year) easier for Muslims.
  • Newfoundland, which is half an hour off from the rest of
    Canada, had a two-hour DST jump in 1988.
  • Russia dropped two of its 11 time zones in 2010, then
    abolished DST a year later. It’s now one of a few places in
    the world that stays on summer hours all year. Argentina,
    Iceland, Russia, Uzbekistan and Belarus also abide by
    year-round summer hours.
  • Samoa, which introduced DST in 2010, lost the entire day of
    Dec. 30, 2011 when it switched time zones.
  • Antarctica doesn’t get any daylight in the winter but still
    practices DST to be in sync with supply stations in Chile and
    New Zealand.
  • The Queen’s staff spend more than 50 hours adjusting 1,000
    clocks across her residences.

Interested in learning more? You can find information available about this topic on the official wikipedia page for daylight saving time here.

Rememberance Day 2014

Lest we forget.

Written by collegecopy on . Posted in Fresh Copy Newsletter

Rememberance Day 2014

Remembrance Day began as a way to honour those fallen in the first world war. Today we celebrate the sacrifices that the men and women of our armed forces have made to preserve our freedoms through many wars and conflicts. Thank you.

College Copy Shop.

“Though they are gone, they are not forgotten. We will always remember the brave and the fallen. They still stand tall, for us all!”

– Bridgitte Williams

Daylight Savings – Fall Back

Written by downtown on . Posted in Fresh Copy Newsletter

This Sunday, November 5th is the designated transition of Daylight Savings for Albertans. We will “fall back” and gain an extra hour of daylight each day, allowing us to effectively lengthen our already bitterly short winter days and enjoy more sunlight each morning.

The conecpt of daylight savings dates back as far as 1895 in New Zealand, however the first country to implement this practice was the German Empire in 1916, as a way to conserve coal during wartime (it was known as Sommerzeit). Within the next two years, many countries worldwide, including Britain, Canada and the USA, followed suit. Daylight saving time is not generally observed in countries near the equator, as the variation in sunrise is not significant enough to warrant the change.

Here are some fun facts we have compiled about daylight saving time from around the globe:

  • Egypt had four daylight saving time changes in 2010. It was
    meant to make the month of Ramadan (which fell during a
    hot summer that year) easier for Muslims.
  • Newfoundland, which is half an hour off from the rest of
    Canada, had a two-hour DST jump in 1988.
  • Russia dropped two of its 11 time zones in 2010, then
    abolished DST a year later. It’s now one of a few places in
    the world that stays on summer hours all year. Argentina,
    Iceland, Russia, Uzbekistan and Belarus also abide by
    year-round summer hours.
  • Samoa, which introduced DST in 2010, lost the entire day of
    Dec. 30, 2011 when it switched time zones.
  • Antarctica doesn’t get any daylight in the winter but still
    practices DST to be in sync with supply stations in Chile and
    New Zealand.
  • The Queen’s staff spend more than 50 hours adjusting 1,000
    clocks across her residences.

Interested in learning more? You can find information available about this topic on the official wikipedia page for daylight saving time here.

Halloween 2014

Happy Halloween!

Written by collegecopy on . Posted in Fresh Copy Newsletter

Halloween 2014

Halloween and Trick-or-treating go hand in hand. The practice of dressing up in costumes and begging door to door for treats dates back to the Middle Ages. Originally referred to as “guising”, trick-or-treating resembles the medieval custom of poor folk going door to door on Hallowmas, for food in return for prayers for the dead on All Souls’ Day. In Canada the practice of “guising” on Halloween was first recorded in 1911 by a newspaper in Ontario.

The earliest known use in print of the term “trick or treat” was much later in 1927, from Blackie, Alberta: “Hallowe’en provided an opportunity for real strenuous fun. No real damage was done except to the temper of some who had to hunt for wagon wheels, gates, wagons, barrels, etc., much of which decorated the front street. The youthful tormentors were at back door and front demanding edible plunder by the word “trick or treat” to which the inmates gladly responded and sent the robbers away rejoicing.”

Happy Halloween from the friendly staff here at College Copy Shop!

Labour Day 2014

Happy Labour Day!

Written by collegecopy on . Posted in Fresh Copy Newsletter

Labour Day 2014

The Toronto Trades Assembly organized Canada’s first significant demonstration for worker’s rights on April 15, 1872. The goal was to release the 24 leaders of the Toronto Typographical Union who were imprisoned for striking for a nine-hour working day. At this time, trade unions were illegal and striking was seen as a criminal conspiracy to disrupt trade.

There was enormous public support for the parade. A few months later, a similar parade in Ottawa passed the house of Canada’s first prime minister, Sir John Macdonald. Later that day, he  promised to repeal all Canadian laws against trade unions.

Labour Day was originally celebrated in the spring but it was moved to the fall after 1894. Canadian trade unions are proud that this holiday was inspired by their efforts to improve workers’ rights.

Happy Labour Day from the friendly staff here at College Copy Shop! We will be closed Monday September 7th for the holiday.

Recent Updates

Daylight Saving – Spring Ahead

This weekend Albertans (and our clocks) took a leap towards spring with Daylight Saving time. This allows us to enjoy sunlight longer into the evenings. With spring just around the corner and the days gradually getting longer, this time change is a … Read More

Daylight Saving – Spring Ahead

This weekend Albertans (and our clocks) took a leap towards spring with Daylight Saving time. This allows us to enjoy sunlight longer into the evenings. With spring just around the corner and the days gradually getting longer, this time change is a harbinger of the season of growth and regeneration. The conecpt of daylight savings […]

Read More
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